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YOUR TIME MACHINE TO THE PAST!

Contact Us: Swapsale@aol.com

TRENDS

http://sharetv.org/shows/american_bandstand

American Bandstand was an American musical variety show that aired in various versions from 1952 to 1989, hosted from 1957 until its final season by Dick Clark, who also served as producer. The show featured teenagers dancing to Top 40-type music introduced by Clark; at least one popular musical act—over the decades, running the gamut from Jerry Lee Lewis to Run DMC—would usually appear in-person to lip-sync one of their latest singles. Freddy "Boom Boom" Cannon holds the record for most appearances at 110.

The show's popularity helped Dick Clark become an American media mogul and inspired other similar long-running music programs, such as Soul Train and Top of the Pops. Clark eventually assumed ownership of the program through his Dick Clark Productions company.

It premiered locally in late September 1952 as Bandstand on Philadelphia television station WFIL-TV Channel 6 (now WPVI-TV), as a replacement for a weekday movie that had shown predominantly-British movies. Hosted by Bob Horn as a television adjunct to his radio show of the same name on WFIL radio, Bandstand mainly featured short musical films produced by Snader Telescriptions and Official Films, with occasional studio guests. This incarnation was an early predecessor of sorts of the music video shows that became popular in the 1980s, featuring films that are themselves the ancestors of music videos.

Horn, however, was disenchanted with the program, so he sought to have the show changed to a dance program, with teenagers dancing along on camera as the records played, based on an idea that came from a radio show on WPEN, The 950 Club, hosted by Joe Grady and Ed Hurst. This more-familiar version of Bandstand debuted on October 7, 1952 in "Studio 'B'", which was located in their just-completed addition to the original 1947 building (4548 Market Street), and was hosted by Horn, with Lee Stewart as co-host until 1955. Tony Mammarella was the original producer with Ed Yates as director. The short Snader and Official music films continued in the short term, mainly to fill gaps as they changed dancers during the show—a necessity, as the studio could not fit more than 200 teenagers.

On July 9, 1956, Horn was fired after a drunk driving arrest, as WFIL and dual owner Walter Annenberg's The Philadelphia Inquirer at the time were doing a series on drunk driving. He was replaced temporarily by producer Tony Mammarella before the job went permanently to Dick Clark.

MORE:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Bandstand

http://www.kitsch-slapped.com/2010/04/soul-train-lessons/

Like the soap opera, American Bandstand represents the transference of a successful radio format to burgeoning arena of American television. Unlike the soap opera however, the radio broadcast format of playing recorded music developed as popular entertainers from radio migrated to the newer medium of television. Initially located in the margins of broadcast schedules, the format of a live disk jockey spinning records targeted toward and embraced by teenagers soon evolved into the economic salvation of many radio stations. For one thing, the programs were relatively inexpensive to produce.

MORE: http://www.museum.tv/eotvsection.php?entrycode=americanband

http://timstvshowcase.com/bandstnd.html

Dick Clark and teenagers on American Bandstand. (Photograph © Showtime Archives (Toronto)/Pictoral Press.)

http://www.danceheritage.org/publications/treas_blurbs01.html

http://www.hylitradio.com/productlogo/yo5

On August 5, 1957, WFIL-TV Philadelphia’s local weekday afternoon broadcast, Bandstand, went national on ABC, with 27-year-old Dick Clark as host.  Filling the 3:30 PM time slot, American Bandstand was the newly re-named, hour-and-a half-long celebration of all things teen and Top-40.

MORE: http://1957timecapsule.wordpress.com/2010/08/05/august-5-1957-american-bandstand-goes-coast-to-coast/

Justine Carrelli: 

On the cover of this vintage TEEN Magazine is the popular American Bandstand Regular Justine Carrelli. There's another picture of Justine within with an article called "I've Got A Secret." Another Bandstand article is inside the issue and it shows a picture of Pat Molittieri dancing with Mousketeer Bobby Burgess.

MORE: http://www.marshasvintage.com/catalog/item/947044/5710880.htm

Tony Cosmo w Pat Molitteri/Mike Balara w Carole Scaldeferri

MORE: http://boomers-fifties-pinups.com/american_bandstand.html

A backhanded article makes the ex-mice seem desperate for attention. The magazine threw a party for them, Roberta Shore, and the Addrisi Brothers. Also in attendence was Doreen's date (actually her husband), and hostess Pat Molitieri, an ex-bandstand regular.

'Teen [Magazine] was well-written and accurate in its reporting, qualities lacking in its competition. It was the most popular teen fan magazine of its time, and was even powerful enough to take on Dick Clark in a struggle for access to American Bandstand regulars.

MORE: http://www.originalmmc.com/teenmags.html

PAT MOLITTIERI:

Pat Molittieri ~ Born 1-22-1943 ~~ died in Philly in the mid 1970s

Pat married Victor Rannieri and they had two daughters, Dellane Develin & Dana Borghi.

Pat Molittieri with George Hamilton when she had a brief part in the movie WHERE THE BOYS ARE.

MORE: http://www.marshasvintage.com/albums/album_image/2927344/925007.htm

CHARLETTE RUSSO GALLERY

An American Bandstand Regular early to late 50s

 

Charlette dancing with her brother Frank on American Bandstand as Dick Clark looks on
cover of TEEN MAGAZINE

MORE: http://www.marshasvintage.com/charletterussogallery.html

Bunny Gibson and Eddie Kelly

PETER JENNINGS INTERVIEWS BUNNY GIBSON:

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